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Champenoux

07 Nov 2019
11:00 - 12:30

Visuel carré annonce du seminaire de Jurgen Knauer. © INRA, Sarah-Louise Filleux

Seminar: Effects of mesophyll conductance on vegetation responses to elevated CO2 concentrations in a land surface model

Jürgen Knauer, currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at CSIRO, Australia, will present his work on representing leaf internal conductance to CO2 transfer (mesophyll conductance, gm) in land surface models, and its implications on plant productivity and transpiration in a projected future climate. In a second part of the talk, he will present the first results from an extensive gm database, focusing on the relationship between gm and leaf chemical and anatomical traits across plant types. 

Updated on 11/04/2019
Published on 10/18/2019

Visuel annonce du seminaire de Jurgen Knauer. © INRA, Sarah-Louise Filleux
© INRA, Sarah-Louise Filleux

Summary 

The leaf internal conductance to CO2 transfer (mesophyll conductance, gm) is known to affect the available CO2 concentration for carboxylation but is commonly ignored in most photosynthesis models, especially at larger spatial scales. Here, Dr. Jürgen Knauer (CIRSCO, Australia) present first modelling approaches to represent gm explicitly in land surface models (LSMs). Leaf and ecosystem level simulations accounting for gm reveal changes in the photosynthetic CO2 and temperature sensitivity which lead to higher simulations of gross primary productivity and transpiration in a projected future climate, particularly in high latitudes. These model results rely on an accurate representation of the magnitude of gm and its response to environmental factors. In the second part of the talk, I will present first results from an extensive gm database, focusing on the relationship between gm and leaf chemical and anatomical traits across plant types. These results will help to account for the effects of gm in both LSMs and carbon isotope discrimination models.

About the speaker : 

Jürgen Knauer did his PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany, where he worked on observations of vegetation water-carbon coupling and their integration into models. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation - CSIRO in Canberra, Australia where he focuses on the representation of plant physiology and crop management in the land surface model CABLE and their implications for the global carbon cycle.

Practical information

Room Tilleul, 
Reception Building,
Inra Grand Est-Nancy Research Center,
rue d'Amance,
54280 Champenoux,
France

Programme and Registration

Free entrance
Target audience: scientists and students 
Location: Room Tilleu, reception bulding of Inra Grand Est-Nancy Centre
Date and time: Thurday 7 Novembre, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm